Carol Hornbeck

Reducing the Risk of Child Abuse

Posted by in Articles, Carol Hornbeck

Since the United States government declared April National Child Abuse Awareness Month in 1983, secular and religious organizations have worked together to address the causes and effects of child maltreatment and neglect. As a therapist, I witness the lifelong effects of emotional, physical and sexual abuse on children, and on adults who experienced trauma as youngsters. Increasingly we see that many cases of depression, anxiety, and other mental illnesses can have roots in childhood experience. According to the Department of Health and Human Services, some of the factors that contribute to abuse are: Lack of parental understanding of child development Poverty and...

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Tip 16 – Take the focus off consumption and commercialism. Share an experience!

Posted by in Carol Hornbeck, Christmas Tips

Tip 16 – Take the focus off consumption and commercialism. Share an experience!

Board member Alicia Gooden suggests you do something positive or helpful for others.  This will help keep you centered on the purpose of the holiday.  You could donate food to a shelter or pantry, buy a toy for a child in need, or volunteer your time to serve others. Therapist Carol Hornbeck agrees that the commercial aspects of Christmas can contribute to over-stimulation and disillusionment for children and others.  She encourages you to develop simple home rituals such as family advent devotions.  This helps children celebrate the whole Christmas season and takes some of the focus off of consumption.  In addition, doing a family service project together can also...

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Tip 5 – Take Care of Yourself

Posted by in Carol Hornbeck, Christmas Tips, Scott Sweet

Tip 5 – Take Care of Yourself

Take care of yourself and loved ones. Get plenty of sleep. Eat healthy. Drink water. Therapists Scott Sweet and Carol Hornbeck describe how maintaining routine when it comes to sleeping, eating and drinking water have positive effect on our bodies, as well as children’s, during this stressful season. While it is tempting to suspend regular bedtimes and allow children to stay up later, many “melt-downs” can be avoided if children get enough sleep and maintain their regular meal schedules.  Also, even though there is controversial research about the effects of refined sugar and highly processed foods, but it seems clear that if children fill up on too many holiday...

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When Unemployment Hits Home

Posted by in Articles, Carol Hornbeck

Featured in Indy’s Child-November 2013 Written by Sarah McCosham/Featuring Carol Hornbeck Our jobs – what we do with our days, how we earn a living and provide for our families – are an essential part of our identities. A career often defines who we are. As a result, losing a job can be devastating. In fact, job loss is one of the most stressful events an adult can experience. If you are a parent who has lost a job, these feelings can be compounded because of the effect unemployment has on the family’s well-being. How can moms and dads deal with their own concerns while still attending to the needs and questions their children have about their...

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Cooperative Co-Parenting After Divorce

Posted by in Articles, Carol Hornbeck

Cooperative Co-parenting After Divorce:  Working Together to Help Families Heal Often I am asked by parents who have made the decision to divorce: “how can we make sure the kids are okay?” One of the most valuable gifts divorcing parents can give their children is to enter into cooperative co-parenting counseling together.  Through this process, divorced parents can reduce conflict and form a new partnership based on the needs of their children. Forging this new partnership can be challenging.  For many parents, the personality differences, value conflicts and other factors that led to the failure of the marriage can also make it hard to work together in their new...

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Relationship Tip 10- Use “I” Messages

Posted by in Carol Hornbeck, Relationship Tips

Relationship Tip 10- Use “I” Messages

Therapist Carol Hornbeck suggests that when sharing something with your partner that makes you feel frustrated, be sure to use an “I” message.  “I feel annoyed when I find the gas tank empty;  it would help me if you could let me know ahead of time if you don’t have time to fill it up”  is much easier for your partner to hear than a “you” message such as “why don’t you EVER fill up the gas tank after you use the car?” The “YOU” message is likely to make your partner feel criticized, judged, and less motivated to engage with you to change the...

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